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REID HOSPITAL »  Foundation »  I am thankful 2013 »  I am thankful 2012

I am thankful 2012

I am thankful 2012

 

Clayton Harmeyer

Clayton Harmeyer - Athletic Training

Lincoln athlete Clayton Harmeyer headed to the doctor to get his junior year school sports physical.  He was looking forward to another year of football, basketball and track, and this formality was one step to get him on his way.  

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Ron Hollis

Ron Hollis - Heart

Ron Hollis has a history of heart disease. So when he and his wife, Joann, moved to Liberty in early 2011, he was already thinking about making an appointment with a cardiologist at Reid. Unfortunately, Ron's heart couldn't wait.

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Sally Woodward

Sally Woodward - Hospice

Bob and Sally Woodward are household names in Cambridge City where they raised four children and later enjoyed time with their grandchildren and great-grandchildren in the same country home.

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Danielle and Grace

Danielle and Grace - STOP

Sisters Danielle Fox and Grace Roberts were like many children growing up in America.  They ate many of their meals out of a box or a drive-through and spent much of their time in front of the TV.  Their weight was becoming an issue, but more than that, their overall health was suffering.

Read More

 

Ben Caskey

Ben Caskey - Cancer

Long time Liberty resident Ben Caskey was like many other men.  He didn’t have a primary care physician, because he simply did not go to the doctor.  In fact, he had not seen a doctor in 35 years. 

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Jennifer Moistner

Jennifer Moistner - BRAvo!

At age 35, Jennifer Moistner was in her prime.  She had a great family – husband Todd and three step-children – a great job with her husband at DOT Foods and great friends and family near her Dublin home.  She had a strong belief that things happen for a reason.  This belief was about to turn her world upside down.

Read More

 

 

 

Mary Johnson

Mary Johnson - Employee Emergency Fund

For more than six years, Mary Johnson has served employees, patients and visitors of Reid’s Café at Twelve Hundred.  Those who know her think very highly of her.

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Lisa Walden

Lisa Walden - Charity Care

Lisa Walden moved to Richmond from Washington to pursue a Master of Divinity degree at Earlham.  She had been a teacher and librarian as well as serving as a chaplain for the local juvenile detention center prior to her move.  She loved working with middle school and at-risk kids.

Read More

 

 

 

Becky Mann

Becky Mann - Nursing Excellence

As a children’s hospital nurse, Becky Mann closely followed the care of her mother, Jane Anson.  They lived in Eaton, and worked with a primary care physician at Eaton Family Care Center as well as Pulmonologist Dr. Dana Reihman for her mother’s Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD).  But there came a time when Becky and her mother needed to make a decision.  Jane’s doctor recommended Hospice to keep her “stabilized and out of the hospital”.

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Faye Walls

Faye Walls - Where the need is greatest

In September of 2009, Faye Walls and her family doctor agreed it was time to proceed with a partial hysterectomy. After a meeting Dr. Richard Woodruff, gynecologist, Faye received orders for her pre-surgery tests including a chest x-ray. Much to her surprise, she would soon have a change of plans.

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Clayton Harmeyer - Athletic Training

Clayton HarmeyerLincoln athlete Clayton Harmeyer headed to the doctor to get his junior year school sports physical.  He was looking forward to another year of football, basketball and track, and this formality was one step to get him on his way. 

The year before, one Reid physician had noticed something in his heartbeat that was a bit concerning, but didn’t seem to be serious.  This year, when Clayton was called back and sat face-to-face with the physician, he heard a similar comment.  “They heard something they didn’t really like,” he said.  It was time for further tests.

After an EKG and echocardiogram, Clayton was referred to Cardiologist Dr. John McGinty who explained the situation.  “He thought the heart looked a little large, but thought it was an ‘athletic heart’,” said Andrea, Clayton’s mom.  Like any other muscle used frequently, an “athletic heart” is larger than most.  Dr. McGinty wanted to perform a stress test to be sure there were no underlying issues. 

“Dr. McGinty called me after hours and said Clayton’s blood pressure was through the roof,” Andrea said.  “He needed blood pressure medicine, but because of Clayton’s age, he wanted us to see a pediatrician.”  Clayton soon began medication and was monitored at Reid by pediatric cardiologist Dr. Leonard Steinberg. 

The doctor wanted Clayton to have his blood pressure checked prior to playing sports, so Clayton, Andrea and Reid Athletic Trainer Denny McCord agreed on acceptable numbers.  Every day, Denny would monitor Clayton’s blood pressure to see if he was in the safe range to join his team. 

“Only one time all year was it low enough to practice,” Clayton said. 

“Denny was just really good through it all.  He had the bad job of telling him every day he couldn’t play,” Andrea said.  “At no point did we want to take any kind of chance.”

Although Clayton’s blood pressure was under control, he continued feeling palpitations.  Denny recommended he see his physician again, hoping everything would be okay and Clayton could return to football.  Unfortunately, this visit led to another stress test and a diagnosis beyond hypertension – supraventricular tachycardia.  Clayton needed a heart surgery.

Of course, Clayton was nervous about the diagnosis and upcoming procedure.  “Denny said it was no big deal, and he would let his own kids do it,” Clayton said.  “He was just really a good friend too.”

Following an eight-hour catheterization, Clayton’s heart was repaired.  In just two days, he was allowed to play basketball again.

“I was worried I would never get to play again,” Clayton said.  “Denny said I would be fine - he cared.”

“It is just a comfort knowing someone is there,” said Andrea.  “Denny has been great!” 

Clayton’s final sentiment – “Thank you.”

Reid Foundation supports 11 area high schools with free full-time athletic trainers working with student athletes on stretching, strength and agility.  Sometimes, as with Clayton, this role is expanded.

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Ron Hollis - Heart

Ron HollisRon Hollis has a history of heart disease. So when he and his wife, Joann, moved to Liberty in early 2011, he was already thinking about making an appointment with a cardiologist at Reid. Unfortunately, Ron’s heart couldn’t wait.

The first sign of trouble was dizziness, followed by several episodes of ventricular tachycardia, otherwise known as a very fast heartbeat. When Ron called 911 for help, he was asked where he’d like to go. The answer: “Take me to Reid.”

Doctors and nurses in Reid’s emergency department were able to get Ron’s heart rate back under control. They referred him to Dr. Zulfiqar A. Mirza, an interventional cardiologist on staff at Reid, who ordered an angiogram, a test that uses X-rays to view the heart’s vessels. Results indicated blockages in two arteries—Ron would need angioplasty to widen the arteries and stents to keep them open. Dr. Mirza operated the next day in one of the hospital’s state-of-the-art cardiac catheterization suites.

It would be several months before Ron would truly recover. The stents were effective, but he was still experiencing problems with his heart rate, as well as high blood pressure. He began seeing Dr. Allen B. Joseph, a Reid cardiologist, who worked closely with him to adjust his medications. Today, Ron says, he is feeling great and able to enjoy favorite activities such as golf and gardening. He credits God, his family and the health professionals at Reid with helping him heal.

“At Reid, I am treated as if I am their most important patient. Everyone — from the ladies at the reception desk to the nurses and doctors — is first class,” says Ron, a retired golf professional. “They take time to make sure I am comfortable and that all my questions have been answered. When we lived in California, I received excellent care and didn’t think anything could be better. But Reid has been fantastic.”

In addition to excellent physicians and staff, our region has access to top-notch facilities and the latest technology.  The Heart Fund helps provide necessary equipment so our patients have a great experience and quick recovery.

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Sally Woodward - Hospice

Patient Bob and Sally Woodward are household names in Cambridge City where they raised four children and later enjoyed time with their grandchildren and great-grandchildren in the same country home. 

Several years ago, Bob sold his Knightstown business, where he made ambulances and fire trucks, and chose the semi-retired life of truck driving.  His father owned a trucking business, and as a child, he enjoyed traveling with him, riding in the huge steering wheel. Of course, this was prior to car seats.  From that time, driving became his hobby and enjoyment – from family road trips to racecars.

Two years ago, however, Bob learned he had a rare form of liver cancer.  The doctors recommended he not pursue treatment due to the type and progression of the disease.

When the doctor recognized Bob was growing weak, he recommended Reid Hospice.  “I had heard about hospice,” said Sally, “but I had no idea what all they did.”

In the beginning, the hospice team managed pain and answered questions.  The chaplain visited and, at times, brought medications.  Later, their role grew. 

“From the first day they came, I felt like they were taking care of him, but they were also taking care of me.”  

“I just don’t think I could have handled it by myself.  They were always gracious,” Sally said.  “Anytime I called, there was a cheerful voice on the phone.” 

They soon became attached to the hospice nurses, affectionately identified as “their girls”.  Eventually, Bob realized he could no longer sit in his chair, and asked Sally to call for help.  Virginia Weilenman, one of “his girls,” came right away to help him into the bed that hospice had already delivered to be used when needed.

“We knew if we really needed them, they would be right here,” said Sally.  “They were all so kind.  There are not really words to explain how you feel about them.”

After six months of hospice care, Bob passed away in his home with his wife of more than 57 years and all four children by his side. 

A few months later, Sally and her family were invited to a special Reid Hospice memorial service, where names were read of those who had recently passed away.  She and her family were extremely grateful for the opportunity to remember Bob and an opportunity to again thank his caregivers.  “There was just something special there,” she said. 

“I’m just very, very thankful,” said Sally.  “They really cared.”

The Hospice Fund provides important care for families dealing with the death of a loved one.  This care includes clinical and spiritual support.  It is part of our mission to support “Wholeness – in body, mind and spirit.”

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Danielle and Grace - STOP

Danielle and Grace Sisters Danielle Fox and Grace Roberts were like many children growing up in America.  They ate many of their meals out of a box or a drive-through and spent much of their time in front of the TV.  Their weight was becoming an issue, but more than that, their overall health was suffering. 

At ages 10 and 6, something needed to change. And their mother Melissa was determined to get help.  Referred by their pediatrician, Melissa enrolled the girls in Reid’s Stop Taking On Pounds (STOP) program, and their family was ready to establish new, healthy habits. 

In the beginning things were slow and difficult.  “It’s more about not giving up,” Danielle said.  “It was hard in the moment, but it’s not just about losing weight; it’s about being healthy and having a healthy heart.”

One part of the program encouraged the girls to get up and get moving.  This included the use of pedometers each day.  “We would march around in the driveway to get extra steps,” Danielle said.  Grace took her pedometer to school for Show and Tell.  She explained to the class, “I use this to run.”

Danielle loved exercising.  She ran 20 minutes – usually laps around the house - every morning before starting her day.  The girls learned to get up and do jumping jacks on commercials when they were watching TV. 

Grace liked basketball, but her favorite part was learning the food groups.  Logging food, trying new fruits, and learning portion control and how to cook healthy meals kids will eat were all important lessons for the entire family.

“It was about being a team and holding each other accountable,” Melissa said.  “There were days I would go to Christie Ferriell (Diabetes and Nutrition Education Coordinator) crying, because I could not motivate them.”  Christie taught parents how to speak on the kids’ level. 

The entire family learned to set weekly goals, and celebrate when they were met.  “You have to be committed to your family for it to work,” said Melissa.

The results were startling.  During the 12-week program, Grace lost 6 pounds, decreased her body fat by 4½ percent and decreased her BMI by 2 percent.  Danielle lost nearly 16 pounds and decreased her body fat 10 percent and her BMI 5 percent. 

“It’s not just about losing weight,” said Danielle.  “It’s about being healthy and having a healthy heart.”

Danielle would offer advice to other kids entering the program: “Don’t give up.  Don’t think of it as how much time is left; think of it as ‘I’m gonna have fun today’!”

Melissa and her girls are thankful for the STOP program.  She knows her decision to make lifestyle changes will have lifelong benefits.  “It is for your kids. The behaviors you teach them now, they will teach their kids someday.”

STOP is a free physician-referred weight management program for ages 7-17.  By learning more about eating right, exercising and choosing healthy lifestyle habits, they can reach their weight management goals. 

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Ben Caskey - Cancer

Ben Caskey Long time Liberty resident Ben Caskey was like many other men.  He didn’t have a primary care physician, because he simply did not go to the doctor.  In fact, he had not seen a doctor in 35 years. 

After helping his father fight a long battle with prostate cancer, and eventually seeing him pass away at the age of 74, Ben realized he needed to have regular screenings.  He finally made the choice to take advantage of the free annual PSA screenings and digital exams. 

For years, Ben attended the screenings and received the good news every man wants to hear.  Then, after seven years, things took a turn.  Even though the PSA numbers were in the normal range, the digital exam indicated a problem. 

“If you don’t have that digital exam, you really need to,” Ben said.  His wife Pam added, “Who knows how many years would have gone by before the PSA count had gone up.”

The physician Ben saw that day asked one of the specialists to for a second opinion prior to moving forward, but the answer was identical.  He needed a biopsy and eventually surgery.   Patient Navigator Brenda Bowman referred Ben to Reid’s Urological Care.

“The surgery was easy,” Ben said.  “The doctor was wonderful, and I had a good experience at the hospital.”

Due to scarring and other issues, Ben had two follow-up surgeries, but continued pushing through every challenge.  Brenda led Ben through the entire process, answering questions as needed and keeping him “well-informed” of each step.

Over the next two years, Ben continued to have PSA tests every three months.  The count slowly increased each time, leading to another difficult decision.  Under the care of Dr. John Jacobs, Ben began radiation treatments to “clean it up”.  Fortunately, Ben had no reactions to the radiation, completing his 38 treatments in just a few weeks.    

“Dr. Jacobs was really good,” Pam said.  “He just spelled it all out.” 

Ben pushed through his treatment trying to keep his life as normal as possible.  “Nothing slowed me down,” he said.  The care of the entire team – primary care, oncology, patient navigator and surgeons – worked together to make the process as smooth as possible. 

Now, cancer free, Ben is back to cheering for his favorite teams – Reds and Bengals - and going to the theatre with Pam to watch their daughter, Hollie, perform.  Mostly, he loves spending time with his wife.  They know, together they can face anything.

Pam’s final advice: “Men need to have the physical exam, and tell friends to do the same.  Suck it up and do it!”

Often, patients are overwhelmed and confused.  The Cancer fund provides patient navigators to assist with appointments and introductions and answer questions.  For Ben Caskey, that knowledge was invaluable.

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Jennifer Moistner - BRAvo!

Jennifer Moistner At age 35, Jennifer Moistner was in her prime.  She had a great family – husband Todd and three step-children – a great job with her husband at DOT Foods and great friends and family near her Dublin home.  She had a strong belief that things happen for a reason.  This belief was about to turn her world upside down. 

Jennifer grabbed a stack of mail and headed out the door to the post office.  The wind was stronger than usual that day, and as she stooped to get inside her car, the door blew shut on her.  She was sure she would have a bruise on her chest, but she kept going.  With a little pain, she knew it would pass.

Two days later, Jennifer found a lump on her breast, but again, she brushed off the notion of any major problem.  After four or five weeks of dealing with the lump, she finally headed up to Reid’s Hagerstown Family Practice to see Dr. Scott Marsteller.  He too believed the lump was correlated to the car door, but just to be safe, he ordered a mammogram and ultrasound to rule out anything more serious.

“The next day, Dr. Marsteller called me at work – he called.” Jennifer said, impressed that the doctor took time out to make the call himself.   He asked her to come right up to his office to meet.  An abnormality appeared in the tests, but Dr. Marsteller wanted her to get a second opinion.  The same day, Jennifer would see general surgeon Dr. Christopher Moore. 

“I went back to work that day and met Todd in the conference room,” Jennifer said.  “It was shocking,” Todd said.  “The hardest part was not knowing what we were up against.”

“By the time I got back to work, Dr. Moore’s office called and said I needed to come right away and bring someone,” Jennifer said.  He needed to remove the lump.  “By 3 p.m., I was in surgery.” 

Dr. Moore removed a golf ball size mass.  Still guessing it was benign, he sent it to pathology – just in case. 

“He’s been phenomenal – compassionate and caring,” Jennifer said.  “He was great with surgery; He was great with the aftercare.”

Unfortunately, things did not go as they hoped.  Dr. Moore received the report and in disbelief sent it back for a second opinion.  There were cancer cells. 

“We have no family history of breast cancer,” Jennifer said.  “It was a shock to know this was for real.”

Jennifer and Todd soon met with the oncologist for an extensive meeting.  They discussed the cause, what was feeding the cancer, where it might have originated.  “He spent an hour and a half with us!” Jennifer said. “He made it so easy to understand the ifs and buts.”

“They have to give you this information - This is an aggressive cancer.  We are going to treat it as aggressively as we can,” Todd said.  “If they would have tiptoed around, it would have been much worse.”

In the end, the overwhelming decision was clear.  Jennifer would have a mastectomy. 

Jennifer had four surgeries in eight weeks.  The doctors found another cancerous spot in the tissue which was too small to detect any other way than through surgery.  “We would have had all kinds of problems down the road,” she said. 

“So many people were saying, ‘Maybe you should get a second opinion or go to Indy or Ohio State.’ There has not been any inconsistent information to make me question it,” Jennifer said.  “Whether I’ve talked to the surgeon, the patient navigator, or the oncologist, all the information has been the same.  They are so daggone consistent.  It blows me away!”

“I’m so proud to say at Reid Hospital, I’m an individual, and they care for my case,” said Jennifer.

Todd was thankful the clinical team always included him in the care.  “It was us together going through this,” Jennifer said.  “They catered to Todd with warm blankets and something to eat.”

“I felt like I was staying in a hotel,” Todd added. 

Jennifer is now visiting Reid every other week for chemotherapy treatments, but seeing the light at the end of the tunnel.  Soon Jennifer will be back to her busy life balancing work and family.  She will be running with Todd in another 5K.  But she will face each day with a renewed perspective, perhaps even more thankful for family, friends, and the opportunities that lie ahead. 

Reid Foundation’s BRAvo! fund helps ensure all women have access to regular mammograms, regardless of ability to pay.

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Mary Johnson - Employee Emergency Fund

Mary Johnson For more than six years, Mary Johnson has served employees, patients and visitors of Reid’s Café at Twelve Hundred.  Those who know her think very highly of her. 

Mary has always had a heart to donate blood during Reid’s blood drives.  She understands the need and believes in the cause.  However, because Mary has difficulty with bruising, her husband, Joe, decided to step into her place and donate blood.

After several times of donating blood without a problem, Joe found himself back at Reid in March 2011 for another round.  This time, the staff realized he was iron deficient and recommended he see his primary care physician.  Like many, Joe didn’t initially take the warning seriously.  When he returned for the next blood drive, things had worsened. 

“They again recommended he get his iron checked,” Mary said.  “They said his iron was so low it was life-threatening.”

Following a visit to Joe’s primary care physician, Dr. Kristen Jarvis, Joe had some tests and learned he had a bleeding ulcer and multiple myeloma – cancer of the bone. 

“For most people, it takes forever to diagnose,” Mary said.  Fatigue is often the only symptom.  “Donating blood basically saved his life.”

Joe worked with Dr. Jarvis and Dr. Qin, Reid oncologist, but eventually was referred to Indianapolis for a stem cell transplant.  In November, Joe was in the Indianapolis hospital for 21 days for the procedure and recovery. 

“It takes two months to see if they got all of the cancer,” said Mary.  “Joe’s was still growing, so we had to repeat it in February.”

Faith gave Joe and Mary the strength to get push through in spite of the bad news.  With God’s help, they would make it. 

Joe and Mary’s finances were strained.  They had missed work, accumulated medical expenses, and traveled for treatment.  “That’s when someone told me about the Employee Emergency Fund,” Mary said. 

After a short application process, Mary was approved for assistance through the Foundation’s fund, which is designated to help employees during an urgent, unexpected life event.  The gift helped pay for food, laundry and gas for Mary during Joe’s second stay in Indianapolis. 

“It’s there when you need it,” Mary said.  “It was just one thing we didn’t have to worry about – not just for me, but for Joe too.”  Joe knew she had what she needed. 

Fortunately, a page has turned.  Joe is now in remission.  He will continue treatment and monitoring indefinitely, but Joe and Mary are thankful for health; they are thankful for the blood drive staff; and they are thankful for the employees who donated and helped in a time of need. 

“It was a blessing.”

We invite you to help employees like Mary through the unforeseen circumstances of life.  Whether travel expenses for a funeral or recovery from a fire, the Employee Emergency Fund is there for those who truly need help.

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Lisa Walden - Charity Care

Lisa Walden Lisa Walden moved to Richmond from Washington to pursue a Master of Divinity degree at Earlham.  She had been a teacher and librarian as well as serving as a chaplain for the local juvenile detention center prior to her move.  She loved working with middle school and at-risk kids. 

When Lisa arrived in Richmond, her calling was deep.  She had been through so much.  In 2007, she was diagnosed with Castleman’s Disease, with a benign tumor near her trachea.  Because it was not large, it was not treated.  In 2008, Lisa discovered she had ovarian cancer, and in 2009, stage one breast cancer.  She was ready to move forward and help others. 

During a two-year timeframe, Lisa’s trouble with exhaustion expanded into memory issues.  She was having difficulty processing her class material, but didn’t know why.  Then, Lisa saw Reid’s ad for heart and lung scans.  She knew this was a great screening, and decided to schedule one. 

When she received the results, she was startled.  She knew she had a tumor from her previous diagnosis, but it had grown to the size of a fist.  “The doctor called it huge,” Lisa said.  “I had no insurance, and I didn’t know what I would do.”  The staff directed her to Reid’s patient financial services where she explained her financial situation. 

“Kathy Shaw was marvelous!” Lisa said.  “I didn’t think about the hospital having a charity program.  I had never needed help.”  Fortunately, Lisa qualified for financial assistance, and she was able to pursue treatment.

“Your financial support gives me the hope that at some point in the near future, I might have the energy and mind to return to chaplaincy,” she said.  “You have offered me such dignity at every turn.”

After surgery by Dr. John Kuhn, Lisa followed up with neurologist Dr. James Burkhart.  He had been “studying up” on Castleman’s Disease, and referred Lisa to Dr. Candice Flaugher who specializes in Rheumatology. 

“I went to Dr. Flaugher’s office and asked if they deal with Castleman’s,” said Lisa expecting they would not.  “I cried when they told me they did.”  She had been looking for someone who understood the disease and could provide insight and care. 

“Thank you for giving me another chance at life,” Lisa said.  “Thank you for trusting that your investment in the unknown poor might make a difference in this world.”

Each year, many people like Lisa enter walk through our doors in need of care, frightened knowing they cannot afford it.  Your donation to the Charity Care fund helps provide necessary treatment for those in need.

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Becky Mann - Nursing Excellence

Becky Mann As a children’s hospital nurse, Becky Mann closely followed the care of her mother, Jane Anson.  They lived in Eaton, and worked with a primary care physician at Eaton Family Care Center as well as Pulmonologist Dr. Dana Reihman for her mother’s Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD).  But there came a time when Becky and her mother needed to make a decision.  Jane’s doctor recommended Hospice to keep her “stabilized and out of the hospital”.

“As a nurse, I know families have loved ones in and out of the hospital emergency room,” Becky said.  “I knew I didn’t want that to happen to my mom.”

Becky also knew the cost associated with hospital stays and ER visits.  She was certain Hospice care would keep her mother more comfortable and also relieve the financial burden.

Jane and Becky had a difficult conversation.  Hospice did not mean Jane would die the next day.  It meant she had an end of life illness.  They decided to call Reid to begin care, and decided on assisted living to have a back-up generator for her oxygen.  Jane wanted to stay in assisted living the remainder of her life.  The Hospice team “knew this desire and did what they could to make it happen,” Becky said.

“Marj Denlinger, Cathy Hale and Pat Williams (Registered Nurses) did so much about managing her illness,” said Becky.  “Instead of carting her off to the hospital, they could do labs and X-rays in her assisted living home.”

“She developed a real bond with Marj,” Becky’s husband, Russ, added.  “They were buds.”  They appreciated Elayne Toney, Patient Care Tech (PCT), for her regular visits and helping Jane bathe. 

Because of Hospice, Jane was able to continue doing the things she enjoyed even in assisted living.  She got dressed with her jewelry every day.  Her friends came to her for their 50-year bridge club tradition.  She could go on an occasional ride to her favorite place, a bridge at Fort Saint Clair, where her husband proposed to her.  Community and family were her life.

Although Becky continued to work, she stayed connected with the nurses through a notepad, where they would write notes back and forth.  “I couldn’t have done it without them,” Becky said.  “Here I am a nurse, but I couldn’t’ regulate her meds.”  Becky’s nursing experience was completely different in the children’s hospital than what Jane needed.  “Marj’s expertise was great.”

After a long life and extended nursing care through Hospice, Jane passed away at the age of 89.  She was comfortable in her own assisted living home. 

“Hospice prolonged her life,” Russ said.  Becky added, “Without a doubt, it gave me more time with my mom.”

The Nursing Excellence fund provides our staff with continuing education and necessary equipment to best serve patients throughout Reid’s services, whether inpatient, specialty care or hospice.  Supporting our clinical staff gives patients the best experience and the best outcomes.  

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Faye Walls - Where the need is greatest

Patient In September of 2009, Faye Walls and her family doctor agreed it was time to proceed with a partial hysterectomy. After a meeting Dr. Richard Woodruff, gynecologist, Faye received orders for her pre-surgery tests including a chest x-ray. Much to her surprise, she would soon have a change of plans.

"While waiting for the results and scheduling, I received a phone call telling me I needed to see Dr. Stephen Hornak to discuss my chest x-ray," Faye said. "He advised me that I needed a stress test, because of something he observed on the x-ray."

Unfortunately, the stress test led to a heart catheterization and the catheterization to a serious conversation with Dr. Hornak.

"I was told that my 'widow maker' and the artery next to it were almost totally closed," said Faye. She went on to say there was no warning of her condition. "I did awake, one morning, prior to the test, and had a stiff neck. I dismissed it, thinking it had gotten that way sleeping."

On October 22, Faye had double bypass surgery, performed by Dr. John Kuhn ? just one day after the catheterization. Faye appreciated Dr. Kuhn's positive bedside manner. "I love him!" she said.

"I can honestly tell you, I do not remember having any pain during my entire stay at Reid," Faye added. "It seemed like (the staff) knew what I needed without me asking. They made me feel like my stay was the most important thing they had to do."

Following her surgery, Faye proceeded to the rehabilitation department where she exercised and followed a 12-week schedule for her recuperation.

"The staff at Rehab was great," Faye said. "They showed, in their professionalism, that they were concerned for my total recovery."

Nearly 19 months after Faye and her family physician made the decision to proceed with a hysterectomy, she was strong enough to have the surgery.

Sharing that her brother and sister had both died at a young age from heart attacks, Faye is thankful to the doctors and staff at Reid for catching her heart problems in time.

"I'm proud to have Reid in my community!"

Patients like Faye, benefit from educated staff and comfortable facilities. Others need charity care or transportation assistance to their cancer treatments. The Where the need is greatest fund provides for all these needs and allows us to allocate donations as appropriate.

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The material presented on this website is not offered as legal or tax advice.

Make a gift

Make a donation to Reid Hospital Foundation in support of important services, such as hospice, the athletic training program or community benefit mammograms.

Athletic Trainer Program

Reid provides area high schools with free athletic trainers. Read about them here.

 

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